HOT APPLE CHUTNEY

 
 

In England, we’re spoilt for choice when it comes to apples — so many varieties and we almost take for granted how easy they are to get hold of all year round. A friend I met in India named them her favourite fruit. My response was, “Really? I love a papaya and mango — we should really swap countries!”

I’ve usually always got apples in my fruit bowl at home, since moving house I’m now even the proud owner of an apple tree. Stewed spiced apples are a favourite for breakfast and now, thanks to this new recipe, I can enjoy their delicious flavour throughout my day, too.

Originating in India, chutneys are an age-old way of preserving fruit and vegetables when you’ve got a glut, and are one of my favourite condiments. A quick chop and a simmer on the hob and you’ve got something you can use as an accompaniment for a number of dishes. From dals and curries to dips and sandwiches, just a teaspoon or two of this sweet, tart chutney not only goes with everything, and props up 5 of the 6 Ayurvedic tastes, it also helps to ignite your Agni (digestive fire).

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 medium apples, peeled and chopped

  • ¼ cup raisins

  • Juice of ½ lemon

  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon

  • ½ teaspoon ground ginger

  • Grind of black pepper

  • ⅛ teaspoon salt

  • 1 tablespoon of jaggery

  • A pinch of cayenne or chilli

  • 1 cup water

METHOD

  1. Place all ingredients into a saucepan and bring to the boil.

  2. Reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes with the lid on.

  3. Remove the lid and continue simmering for 20-25 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the chutney has reduced to your preferred consistency.

  4. Store in a clean glass jar somewhere cool or in the fridge for a up to a week.

East by West tip: I’ve usually got some leafy greens and/or turmeric (both ‘bitter tastes’)  in most of my meals but if you’re using this chutney to Ayurvedically enhance a more western dish that doesn’t have these ingredients, then make this chutney an ‘all rounder’ with all 6 tastes by cooking in some turmeric or fenugreek seeds.

 
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